VCA Berwyn Animal Hospital

Comprehensive peri-operative monitoring

Just as with humans, there are always risks when putting an animal under anesthesia. At our hospital, we take extra precautions to minimize those risks. For instance, every anesthetized animal is continuously monitored by one of our knowledgeable and trained technical staff members. This staff member sees the patient throughout the entire anesthetic event, evaluating various reflexes, monitoring response to surgical stimuli, and various vital signs.

In addition, there are several monitoring devices used that measure and record various physiologic levels in the anesthetized patient:

Electrocardiogram measures the electrical activity of the heart
An ultrasonic Doppler allows us to evaluate the patient's systolic blood pressure. Additionally, we use continuous blood pressure monitoring which accesses the patient's diastolic blood pressure and MAP, or mean arterial pressure. Blood pressure is valuable in assessing anesthetic depth as it is one of the first parameters to change as anesthetic depth changes
Pulse oximetery measures heart rate and oxygen content of blood
Carbon dioxide levels are even more valuable than oxygen levels for detecting respiratory abnormalities
Esophageal temperature probes measure core temperature of the anesthetized animal
Pre-anesthetic blood tests helps our doctors to determine if a patient is healthy enough or not to be anesthetized

All of the above monitoring devices are equipped with auditory alarms that alert the surgeon and technical staff member of any changes or abnormal values.

At our hospital, every anesthetic plan is formulated plan for each, individual patient. Drugs used permit immediate, yet safe, anesthesia with minimal cardiovascular and respiratory effects. In fact, many of the drugs we use are also used in human hospitals!

Departments

Emergency/Critical Care, Surgery
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General Practice

We have over 600 animal hospitals in 41 states and 4 Canadian provinces that are staffed by more than 3,000 fully-qualified, dedicated and compassionate veterinarians, with more than 400 being board-certified specialists.

The nationwide VCA family of general practice hospitals give your pet the very best in medical care, providing a full range of general medical and surgical services as well as specialized treatments such as wellness, spay/neuter, advanced diagnostic services (MRI/CT Scan), internal medicine, oncology, ophthalmology, dermatology, cardiology, neurology, boarding, and grooming. Services may vary by location.

Our family of pet hospitals stands out by delivering the greatest resources in order provide the highest quality care available for your pets. By maintaining the highest standards of pet health care available anywhere, we emphasize prevention as well as healing. We provide continuing education programs to our doctors and staff and promote the open exchange of professional knowledge and expertise. And finally, we have established a consistent program of procedures and techniques, proven to be the most effective in keeping pets healthy.

Find a VCA General Care Animal Hospital near you:

 

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Emergency Care

Call 708-749-4200 if you have any questions or concern regarding your pet.

We provide emergency care from 8am until 1am seven days a week. We are closed on holidays.

Some symptoms that may indicate your pet may need to be seen on an emergency basis include:

  • Difficulty Breathing and/or pale or blue gums or tongue
  • Heavy Bleeding - apply direct pressure to the wound
  • Major Trauma - if your pet has fallen, been hit by a car or has multiple wounds
  • Gaping Wounds
  • Collapse/Loss of Consciousness
  • Paralysis
  • Lacerations and Bite Wounds
  • Poisoning
  • Infections - or if your pet suddenly gets worse while on medication for an infection
  • Difficulty Urinating - frequent attempts to urinate that don't produce a normal urine flow could indicate infection or obstruction - especially in male cats!
  • Eye Problems - redness, tearing, pain, squinting or eyelid spasms
  • Prolonged or multiple episodes of vomiting or diarrhea

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