VCA Berwyn Animal Hospital


Below, we have provided additional general information about the field of oncology in veterinary medicine and how Dr. Norton, our Internal Medicine specialist may help your pet.

Dr. Norton has knowledge in the diagnosis of cancer, the staging of tumors, the development of treatment plans, and the administration of chemotherapy. When your pet is faced with cancer, he will typically work in concert with your pet's general practitioner veterinarian in order to obtain the best possible medical outcome for your pet.  Should referral to a veterinary oncologist, or veterinary radiation oncologist be needed, referral to either our VCA Arboretum View and VCA Aurora location for advanced diagnostics or treatment is possible.

We will work with you and your pet by developing treatment plans that incorporate one or all of the following options:

• Surgery

• Radiation

• Chemotherapy

• Immunotherapy

My Pet Has Cancer. Now What?

Cancer does appear to be becoming more common in pets, most likely because they are simply living longer. The most important point to realize about this dreaded disease, however, is that just as in people, many forms of the disease can be easily treated, managed, and even cured. Early detection and specialized care are leading to increased survival and cure rates in almost all the types of cancers that afflict pets. From surgery to chemotherapy to radiation therapy, veterinary cancer specialists can offer your pet the very latest diagnostic and treatment options and the best chance of survival. With optimal treatment, cancer in many cases simply becomes another manageable chronic disease.

If your pet is diagnosed with cancer, it is important not to become overwhelmed. Ask your veterinarian to write down the most important points for you to review later. Although the disease is serious, treatment decisions generally do not need to be made quickly. If your pet is diagnosed with cancer, however, you will either want to have your general practice veterinarian work in consultation with a veterinary specialist for your pet's treatment with any of the following conditions:

• Common Cancers
• Skin tumors
• Mammary tumors
• Lymphosarcoma
• Endocrine tumors
• Osteosarcoma
• Hemangiosarcoma

 Will My Regular Veterinarian Still Be Involved?

In most cases, your regular veterinarian will still supervise your pet's veterinary care and will work in tandem with our doctors and any other members of your pet's veterinary health care team.

Did You Know?

Dogs and cats have higher age adjusted incidence rates for many kinds of cancers than do humans. For example, dogs are 35 times more likely to get skin cancer than are humans. They suffer from 8 times the amount of bone cancer and 4 times the amount of breast cancer. However, humans are more likely to get lung and stomach cancers than pets. 

Frequently Asked Questions

What Additional Training Does A Veterinary Oncologist Have?

Any veterinarian who wants to specialize in oncology must first be certified as an internal medicine specialist. Veterinarians who want to become board certified in internal medicine must seek additional, intensive training to become a specialist and earn this prestigious credentialing. Specialty status is granted by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (ACVIM). A veterinarian who has received this specialty status will list the initials, 'DACVIM,' after his or her DVM degree. Or, the veterinarian may indicate that he or she is a 'Diplomate' of the ACVIM. The word 'Diplomate' typically means the specialist has achieved the following:

• Obtained a traditional 8 year veterinary degree (four years of college plus four years of veterinary school).

• Completed an additional three to six years of advanced training, including a residency at a veterinary teaching hospital where the veterinarian will have trained with some of the best experts in the field and obtained hands on experience.

• Completed the credentialing application process established by the ACVIM

• Passed a rigorous general examination.

Once a veterinarian is board certified in internal medicine, he or she may seek additional specialty status in veterinary oncology. Internal medicine specialists must obtain additional training in this area and sit for a second, even more intensive examination. These doctors will list their credentials after their boarded status, for example, as 'DAVCIM (Oncology).'

When your pet needs the care of a veterinary internal medicine specialist/veterinary oncologist, years of intensive training and additional education will be focused on helping him or her to recover from the disease and/or enjoy the highest quality of life possible.

Will Chemotherapy Make My Pet Sick?

Your veterinary oncologist will give you specific instructions regarding your pet's chemotherapy, but in general, you should be aware that pets typically handle chemotherapy regimens far better than people do. First, as cancer treatment for both humans and small animals has become more sophisticated, the side effects created by chemotherapy regimens have become less severe. Second, chemotherapy administration in animals is less aggressive than it is in humans, so animals typically do not become as sick from the side effects as do people.

Finally, veterinary oncologists have many options at their disposal to help keep your pet comfortable during treatment for his or her disease. From pain management options to special nutritional recommendations to medications that can help lessen the nausea associated with chemotherapy, be assured that veterinary oncologists can keep most pets surprisingly comfortable during treatment. In fact, one of the biggest hurdles to treating pets with cancer is that many owners imagine their pet's treatment will be more difficult than it really is.

What are Cancer Treatment Methods?

The goal of cancer therapy is to destroy abnormal cancer cells while sparing normal cells. An important difference in human vs. animal oncology is that the goal with humans, due to our extended life spans, is to cure the disease. In animals, the goal is more to extend the length of life while still maintaining its
quality. In many cases, a veterinary oncologist will combine some or all of the treatment options outlined below in order to provide the very best outcome for your pet.

• Surgery

• Radiation Treatment

• Chemotherapy

• Immunotherapy

How Can I Keep My Pet From Getting Cancer?

Just as in people, there is no proven way to keep your pet from getting cancer. You can, however, take steps to minimize the risks. Avoid any known predisposing causes, such as not spaying or neutering pets, or leaving pets exposed to sunlight. Also make sure your pet has regularly scheduled checkups and follow your veterinarian's advice regarding any necessary screening tests.

What are your hours of operation?

8 AM to 8 PM Monday -Thursday
8 AM to 6 PM Friday
8 AM to 4 PM Saturday

Doctors are on Premises 24/7, 365 days each year so your pet's emergency needs will be taken care of any time night or day. No appointments are needed for emergency care.

Appointments can be made with any of our specialty services by calling 708-749-4200.



What is your payment policy?

Payment is required when services are rendered.  We accept payments by cash, check, as well as all major credit cards.

We also offer  CareCredit, which offers intrest free payment plans. If approved, you can use that for payment right away and be billed monthly.  You can apply here at the hospital, or online at

Veterinarians in Oncology


General Practice

We have over 600 animal hospitals in 41 states and 4 Canadian provinces that are staffed by more than 3,000 fully-qualified, dedicated and compassionate veterinarians, with more than 400 being board-certified specialists.

The nationwide VCA family of general practice hospitals give your pet the very best in medical care, providing a full range of general medical and surgical services as well as specialized treatments such as wellness, spay/neuter, advanced diagnostic services (MRI/CT Scan), internal medicine, oncology, ophthalmology, dermatology, cardiology, neurology, boarding, and grooming. Services may vary by location.

Our family of pet hospitals stands out by delivering the greatest resources in order provide the highest quality care available for your pets. By maintaining the highest standards of pet health care available anywhere, we emphasize prevention as well as healing. We provide continuing education programs to our doctors and staff and promote the open exchange of professional knowledge and expertise. And finally, we have established a consistent program of procedures and techniques, proven to be the most effective in keeping pets healthy.

Find a VCA General Care Animal Hospital near you:


See all VCA Animal Hospitals >


Emergency Care

Call 708-749-4200 if you have any questions or concern regarding your pet.

We provide emergency care from 8am until 1am seven days a week. We are closed on holidays.

Some symptoms that may indicate your pet may need to be seen on an emergency basis include:

  • Difficulty Breathing and/or pale or blue gums or tongue
  • Heavy Bleeding - apply direct pressure to the wound
  • Major Trauma - if your pet has fallen, been hit by a car or has multiple wounds
  • Gaping Wounds
  • Collapse/Loss of Consciousness
  • Paralysis
  • Lacerations and Bite Wounds
  • Poisoning
  • Infections - or if your pet suddenly gets worse while on medication for an infection
  • Difficulty Urinating - frequent attempts to urinate that don't produce a normal urine flow could indicate infection or obstruction - especially in male cats!
  • Eye Problems - redness, tearing, pain, squinting or eyelid spasms
  • Prolonged or multiple episodes of vomiting or diarrhea